If we allow our government to continue operating in secret, it is only a matter of time before you or a loved one find yourself in a position like I did – standing in a secret courtroom, alone, and without any of the meaningful protections that were always supposed to be the people’s defense against an abuse of the state’s power.

Slow to post this, but it’s all kinds of terrifying.

Fantastic writing from Brian Phillips. I’ll be honest I watched a maximum of 30 minutes of non-US soccer during the World Cup. Even then, I didn’t watch the Belgium game. Soccer isn’t my game, but I’ll do just about anything that let’s me drink and be patriotic.

That said, this is a fantastic commentary of the significance of sport. Or really the significance of how we watch them. Here’s the opening, no way you can read this and not read the article.

Watching sports is, among other things, a special way of experiencing time. Sport is like music or fiction or film in that, for a predetermined duration, it asks you to give it control over your emotions, to feel what it makes you feel. Unlike (most) forms of art, though, a game has no foreordained plan or plot or intention. The rules of a game impose a certain kind of order, but it’s different from the order of an artwork. A movie knows where it wants to take you; no one can say in advance where a game will go. All of its beauty, ugliness, boredom, and excitement, all of its rage and sadness emerge spontaneously out of the players’ competing desires to win. For however long the clock runs, your feelings are at the mercy of chance. This happens and then this happens and then this happens. You’re experiencing, in a contained and intensified way, something like the everyday movement of life.

Get the new hotness. Positive reviews are welcome. If you want to be negative at least help us make it better. Among the new things to enjoy…

  • FREE Alerts. You don’t have to be an Insider anymore.
  • Create a team or league right in the app
  • Pretty things

JavaScript Fun

I’m trying to create a decently designed JavaScript function that, when passed a function, returns (you guessed it) a function that runs some authentication code before trying to execute the passed in function. So the return function would look something like this…

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
function createAuthedFunction() {
return function(variable, numberOf, params) {
if(checkAuth()) {
callPassedInFunction(variable, numberOf, params);
}
}
}

Obviously I could just call checkAuth in every function that requires it, but that seems very non-DRY to me. What I’ve ended up going with is this:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
function checkAuthFunction(func, error) {
return function() {
if (checkAuth()) {
func.apply(this, arguments);
} else {
error = error || 'You must be an admin to do that.';
console.log(error)
}
}
}

Now when an object or function wants to create a method that requires authentication to run, it calls checkAuthFunction and passes in a function (and an optional error message) and this returns a function that checks for proper authentication, and either runs the function or outputs an error message, depending on authentication status. Function.apply allows me to call the passed in function with the current this value and the passed in arguments.

It’s working for now, but I’m still not in love with it syntactically.

How are apps made? Painfully with deliberation or effortlessly without thought. Blind inspiration. Eight hours over a lazy weekend. Fifty grand a day. A million dollars a syllable. Do not look for the sense in it.

As designers and product builders, we are told to empathize with our users in order to create awesome experiences for the web and beyond. I propose we take a look at the other side of empathy, and make an effort to empathize with the creators behind the products, features, or designs triggering those rage-tweet reactions seen across many a timeline.

This is something I’ve become a lot more aware of in the past couple of years. Working on a product that is used by millions of people, I know what it’s like to see people bashing what you’ve built. It sucks. I do my best to think before I tweet critically and angrily about a piece of software I’m using.